FDI In Banking Sector Of India Under Consolidated FDI Policy Of India 2012

This is in continuance of our series on Consolidated FDI Policy of India 2012 by DIPP. In this article Perry4Law and Perry4Law Techno Legal Base (PTLB) would discuss the FDI in banking sector of India under the consolidated FDI policy of India 2012.

FDI in private banking sector of India is allowed up to 74% where FDI up to 49% is allowed through automatic route and FDI beyond 49% but up to 74% is allowed through government approval route.

These conditions must also be satisfied in this regard:

(1) This 74% limit will include investment under the Portfolio Investment Scheme (PIS) by FIIs, NRIs and shares acquired prior to September 16, 2003 by erstwhile OCBs, and continue to include IPOs, Private placements, GDR/ADRs and acquisition of shares from existing shareholders.

(2) The aggregate foreign investment in a private bank from all sources will be allowed up to a maximum of 74 per cent of the paid up capital of the Bank. At all times, at least 26 per cent of the paid up capital will have to be held by residents, except in regard to a wholly-owned subsidiary of a foreign bank.

(3) The stipulations as above will be applicable to all investments in existing private sector banks also.

(4) The permissible limits under portfolio investment schemes through stock exchanges for FIIs and NRIs will be as follows:

(i) In the case of FIIs, as hitherto, individual FII holding is restricted to 10 per cent of the total paid-up capital, aggregate limit for all FIIs cannot exceed 24 per cent of the total paid-up capital, which can be raised to 49 per cent of the total paid-up capital by the bank concerned through a resolution by its Board of Directors followed by a special resolution to that effect by its General Body.

(a) Thus, the FII investment limit will continue to be within 49 per cent of the total paid-up capital.

(b) In the case of NRIs, as hitherto, individual holding is restricted to 5 per cent of the total paid-up capital both on repatriation and non-repatriation basis and aggregate limit cannot exceed 10 per cent of the total paid-up capital both on repatriation and non-repatriation basis. However, NRI holding can be allowed up to 24 per cent of the total paid-up capital both on repatriation and non-repatriation basis provided the banking company passes a special resolution to that effect in the General Body.

(c) Applications for foreign direct investment in private banks having joint venture/subsidiary in insurance sector may be addressed to the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) for consideration in consultation with the Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority (IRDA) in order to ensure that the 26 per cent limit of foreign shareholding applicable for the insurance sector is not being breached.

(d) Transfer of shares under FDI from residents to non-residents will continue to require approval of RBI and Government as per para 3.6.2 above as applicable.

(e) The policies and procedures prescribed from time to time by RBI and other institutions such as SEBI, D/o Company Affairs and IRDA on these matters will continue to apply.

(f) RBI guidelines relating to acquisition by purchase or otherwise of shares of a private bank, if such acquisition results in any person owning or controlling 5 per cent or more of the paid up capital of the private bank will apply to non-resident investors as well.

(ii) Setting up of a subsidiary by foreign banks

(a) Foreign banks will be permitted to either have branches or subsidiaries but not both.

(b) Foreign banks regulated by banking supervisory authority in the home country and meeting Reserve Bank‘s licensing criteria will be allowed to hold 100 per cent paid up capital to enable them to set up a wholly-owned subsidiary in India.

(c) A foreign bank may operate in India through only one of the three channels viz., (i) branches (ii) a wholly-owned subsidiary and (iii) a subsidiary with aggregate foreign investment up to a maximum of 74 per cent in a private bank.

(d) A foreign bank will be permitted to establish a wholly-owned subsidiary either through conversion of existing branches into a subsidiary or through a fresh banking license. A foreign bank will be permitted to establish a subsidiary through acquisition of shares of an existing private sector bank provided at least 26 per cent of the paid capital of the private sector bank is held by residents at all times consistent with para (i) (b) above.

(e) A subsidiary of a foreign bank will be subject to the licensing requirements and conditions broadly consistent with those for new private sector banks.

(f) Guidelines for setting up a wholly-owned subsidiary of a foreign bank will be issued separately by RBI.

(g) All applications by a foreign bank for setting up a subsidiary or for conversion of their existing branches to subsidiary in India will have to be made to the RBI.

(iii) At present there is a limit of ten per cent on voting rights in respect of banking companies, and this should be noted by potential investor. Any change in the ceiling can be brought about only after final policy decisions and appropriate Parliamentary approvals.

FDI in public banking sector of India is allowed up to 20% (FDI and Portfolio Investment) through government approval route subject to Banking Companies (Acquisition and Transfer of Undertakings) Acts 1970/80. This ceiling (20%) is also applicable to the State Bank of India and its associate Banks.

Source: Corporate Laws In India.